You Asked: Does Gethsemane Separate the Trinity?

John McKinley | March 27, 2013


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Daniel C. from London asks:

When Jesus says to his Father in the garden of Gethsemane, "not as I will, but as you will" (Mt.26:39), how should we think of this relationships within the Trinity? Did the Son have a different desire or will from the Father?

We posed the question to John McKinley, associate professor of biblical and theological studies at Talbot School of Theology, Biola University, and author of Tempted for Us: Theological Models and the Practical Relevance of Christ's Impeccability and Temptation.

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The theological term that Jesus possesses two wills, one divine and one human, is Dyothelitism. God the Father and God the Son are distinct persons, but they share the same divine will. The difference of Jesus' will from his Father's will in Gethsemane is his human will. By incarnation, God the Son took up a second way of living as a man. He now possesses two natures. Each nature is complete, including a will…


To read the rest of this article, visit http://www.thegospelcoalition.org/en/article/you-asked-does-gethsemane-separate-the-trinity.